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Lesson Plans

Unhealthy Metaphors

by Neil Andersen In Metaphors We Live By, cognitive linguist George Lakoff explains that most of our language is metaphorical. This is especially true when we are discussing abstract ideas rather than concrete ideas. Concretely, we can say that someone is shovelling manure when in a barn, but abstractly, we …

The Art of the Apology

By Diana Maliszewski Practically everything is media, and that includes apologies. An apology is defined as “a regretful acknowledgement of an offence or failure” (www.dictionary.com). Traditional apologies involve the giver and the receiver of the apology, unless you include the adult that might be forcing an apology between children, like …

Bias, Understanding Texts, and Widening Perspectives

The following thread from @Jess5th on Twitter (otherwise known as Jessica Lifshitz, an American elementary school teacher) is a great example of rich discussion, excellent scaffolding, and critical thinking. Although Jess did not necessarily create this as a “media lesson”, it incorporates several key concepts for media literacy. All media …

Why are there villains?

by Neil Andersen, Carol Arcus, Margie Keats, Diana Maliszewski and Michelle Solomon   How could victims need rescuing without villains to abuse them? How could a hero demonstrate heroism without a villain to seek? How could a plot reach its climax without a villain to defeat? Heroes may be stories’ …

“Hijab Hoax” Case Study

by Michelle Solomon and Neil Andersen Because the primary function of media is to communicate culture, media literacy is a wonderfully compelling blend of media studies and cultural studies. The Hijab Hoax news story case study is exactly that blend, and it provides rich learning opportunities. We have packaged the …